MONEY-LIFE BALANCE!

Rich or poor, it’s good to have money.
Sid Lance

MONEY-LIFE BALANCE!

Here are two anecdotes:

  •  Mr. A graduates as an engineer and joins a company as an apprentice. As a diligent worker, he is absorbed in the company and makes a place for himself. He consults his tax advisor and saves money regularly to reduce tax liability. After a few years, he buys a house and gets married to a working girl. His wife works on a clerical post in a bank. Mr. A makes a job change at around 40. By the time he is 60, he has gradually built a formidable savings base, children (2) are well educated (in India) and working on their way to be settled in life. At around 50, he gets a mild heart ailment, but manages to pull on without any recurrence. Today, he is looking forward to a happy retired life with his wife enjoying all the financial independence he wanted in old age that includes a trip to Far East. He also plays chess well and is happy to spend more time for his hobby with other chess lovers.
  • Mr. B, a friend of Mr. A also graduates as an engineer and joins a (different) company as an apprentice. As a diligent worker, he is absorbed in the company and makes a place for himself. He consults his tax advisor and saves money regularly to reduce tax liability. After a few years, he buys a house and gets married. But here the similarity ends.
    Mr. B marries a MBA girl working in a MNC. Also, Mr. B changed jobs thrice each job landing him higher payments and responsibilities. Coupled with the earnings of his wife, by the time he is 55, he had built a huge savings base (around 3 times of Mr. A), his only son was sent to study abroad and is settled there. At 55, Mr. B loses his wife to cancer. Today, Mr. B continues to work for his employer as a consultant (unlike Mr. A who is retired), lives alone with no social life and has no hobbies.
    What is not said above that “Mr. A had been offered one of the high-stress jobs that Mr. B took that had declined the offer!

We keep on hearing about ‘work-life balance, but what about ‘money-life’ balance? The above anecdotes are not representative, but symbolic of people who make choices relating to money that affect work life balance.

One should not be judgemental in money matters. If somebody enjoys being a work alcoholic and earns lots of money, why should anyone have reason to object? Yes, the objection would be to the example set out by such work slaves to other peers at workplace. Having a super-performer boss is never easy for his/her subordinates in office.
Should money-life balance be treated as a subset of work-life balance? This could be the case since choice of type and intensity of work is largely dictated by money expectations. When a person treats the means (money) as an end in itself, everything else (health, family, social life) is sidelined leading to tragic consequences in some cases.

Even our wise ancestors had realised the value of leading a balanced life. The four Purusharthas {objectives} of Hinduism are – Dharma {righteousness}, Artha {money & wealth} , Kaam {sex and desire} and Moksha {salvation}.

Finally, here is a chilling finding:

People who regularly put in overtime and work 10 or 11-hour days increase their heart disease risk by nearly two-thirds, research suggests.

So let’s not forget that money is for life and not vice-versa!!

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s